News: Europe

United States Trade Policy Under a Biden Presidency: Challenges and Opportunities

Global Logistics

By Visiting Fellow Milton Churche. Milton Churche left the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade in 2018 after working on trade policy since 1987. The Trump administration has called into question the value of trade agreements, including of the World Trade Organization 
(WTO), abused the concept of national security to justify openly trade protectionist actions, invoked “trade wars” as legitimate policy tools to advance national objectives, and moved in the direction of managed trade. Would a Biden presidency bring a decisive change in direction on US trade policy?

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Where does the EU’s Eastern Expansion end?

By Richard Pomfret, Professor of Economics & Jean Monnet Chair Economics of European Integration, the University of Adelaide. Until 1989 the eastern border of the EU was set by the Cold War.  Since the end of Communism in Eastern Europe in 1989 and the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, sixteen countries have joined the EU and the border has shifted many hundreds of kilometres to the east.   Apart from the three Baltic countries, the EU’s eastern frontier is now the border of the Soviet Union established in 1945.

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Australia-UK relations and the CPTPP

UK AUS flags podium

By Richard Pomfret, Professor of Economics & Jean Monnet Chair Economics of European Integration, the University of Adelaide. On 17 September Jean Monnet Chair Richard Pomfret participated in an online discussion on Potential Benefits Of An Australia-Uk Free Trade Agreement with Elisabeth Bowes, Chief Negotiator, Regional Trade Agreements Division, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, and Vivien Life, Director Asia and Australasia Negotiations within the UK Department for International Trade. The webinar was chaired by Peter Draper, Executive Director of the Institute for International Trade at The University of Adelaide.

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Managing the risks of rising government support: a case for policy transparency

Policy Transparency

Ken Ash is an Independent Consultant, IIT Visiting Fellow, and former OECD Director of Trade and Agriculture. Governments generally support the smooth functioning of their domestic economies, through maintaining systems of good governance and the rule of law and ensuring a coherent macroeconomic and structural policy environment. Extraordinary support is sometimes also warranted, as is the case today to mitigate the economic impact of COVID-19. Few would dispute that these are essential roles for governments.

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Report on Potential Benefits of an Australia-UK Free Trade Agreement

On 17 September, the IIT hosted an online discussion on potential benefits of an Australia-UK free trade agreement with Elisabeth Bowes, Chief Negotiator, Regional Trade Agreements Division, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT), and Vivien Life, Director Asia and Australasia Negotiations within the UK Department for International Trade.

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Asia-Europe Sustainable Connectivity (AESCON 2020)

The Asia-Europe Sustainable Connectivity Scientific Conference (AESCON) conference is a major ASEM preparatory event around the theme of connectivity.   The conference was organized principally by the European Commission Joint Research Centre and the Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia, and attracted participants from governments, think tanks, universities and the private sector. Initially scheduled to be held in Singapore on 25-27 February, the conference was postponed and held online on 22-25 September.

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Prospects for Australian free trade with a post-brexit United Kingdom

Shipping

By Andrew Stoler, former WTO Deputy Director-General; former Office of the United States Trade Representative senior trade negotiator; and former Executive Director of Institute for International Trade.
Now that the United Kingdom (UK) is once again pursuing an international trade policy independently of its previous membership in the European Union (EU), the UK Government has made clear that it intends to pursue free trade agreements (FTAs) with “Anglosphere” countries (United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand).

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What can Australia gain from agricultural subsidy reform?

Crop Harvesting

By Kym Anderson, George Gollin Professor Emeritus, School of Economics, University of Adelaide; CEPR Fellow; and Honorary Professor of Economics, Arndt-Corden Dept of Economics, Australian National University.
Even though
research earlier this century suggested market access barriers were far more important than domestic subsidies in restricting global farm trade, new analysis suggests farm subsidies have become far more important in recent years.

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The “German” debate on supply chain ethics: assessing the role for businesses in human rights enforcement

Reichtag Building

By Andreas Freytag, Professor and Chair of Economic Policy, Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, and Dr Naoise McDonagh, Lecturer in Political Economy, Institute for International Trade, University of Adelaide.
International supply chains have become a topic of fierce debate in Germany over the past weeks, and perhaps surprisingly not for pandemic-related issues. Proposed new laws requiring due diligence by firms to prevent human rights violations in their supply chains sparked controversy over the degree of responsibility firms can realistically be expected to bear, and how they may enforce this obligation.

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Brexit Done, A UK-EU Trade Agreement to Go?

Britain

By Richard Pomfret, Professor of Economics & Jean Monnet Chair Economics of European Integration, the University of Adelaide
A trade agreement between the UK and EU27 looks in trouble. The UK left the EU on 31 January. 2020 is the transition year when the Withdrawal Agreement is implemented and the UK and EU reach agreement on their future relations.  Distracted by COVID, some people, e.g. Irish deputy PM Simon Coveney, argue that this timeframe for reaching agreement in future relations is too short, while UK negotiators insist that the deadline is non-negotiable.

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