News: US

Prospects for Australian free trade with a post-brexit United Kingdom

Shipping

By Andrew Stoler, former WTO Deputy Director-General; former Office of the United States Trade Representative senior trade negotiator; and former Executive Director of Institute for International Trade.
Now that the United Kingdom (UK) is once again pursuing an international trade policy independently of its previous membership in the European Union (EU), the UK Government has made clear that it intends to pursue free trade agreements (FTAs) with “Anglosphere” countries (United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand).

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What can Australia gain from agricultural subsidy reform?

Crop Harvesting

By Kym Anderson, George Gollin Professor Emeritus, School of Economics, University of Adelaide; CEPR Fellow; and Honorary Professor of Economics, Arndt-Corden Dept of Economics, Australian National University.
Even though
research earlier this century suggested market access barriers were far more important than domestic subsidies in restricting global farm trade, new analysis suggests farm subsidies have become far more important in recent years.

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The “German” debate on supply chain ethics: assessing the role for businesses in human rights enforcement

Reichtag Building

By Andreas Freytag, Professor and Chair of Economic Policy, Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, and Dr Naoise McDonagh, Lecturer in Political Economy, Institute for International Trade, University of Adelaide.
International supply chains have become a topic of fierce debate in Germany over the past weeks, and perhaps surprisingly not for pandemic-related issues. Proposed new laws requiring due diligence by firms to prevent human rights violations in their supply chains sparked controversy over the degree of responsibility firms can realistically be expected to bear, and how they may enforce this obligation.

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The Perfect Storm: Interventionism, Inequality, Decoupling and Zombies

storm clouds

By Carlos A. Primo Braga, Associate Professor, Fundação Dom Cabral and former Director, Economic Policy and Debt, The World Bank.
Covid-19 already ranks among the most impactful pandemics of the last 100 years. Most governments have put their economies in a temporary “coma” with a view to mitigate the spread of the virus (SARS-CoV2). This inevitably increases the economic pain associated with the pandemic in the short run and generates pressures for a quick return to normality. Lessons from the past, however, suggest that the health crisis can go on for much longer than most politicians anticipate.

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Geopolitics, Trade and Protectionism: Covid-19’s impact and paths forward

Boat in water

Dr. Naoise McDonagh - Lecturer in Political Economy, Institute for International Trade
As the coronavirus continues to spread globally, country after country has had to implement the three “L”s: lockdown non-essential services and operations; lockout all non-essential people who are not citizens; lock-in all goods that are considered to be essential to managing the growing health emergency.

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A Phase One Deal, but for what purpose?

US China Trade War

Naoise McDonagh - Lecturer, Institute for International Trade, University of Adelaide
What does the Phase One trade deal between the U.S. and China indicate for the wider trade conflict between the two countries? To answer that question requires analysis of the deal’s specifics in the broader context of the trade conflict and its underlying causes.

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The US & the WTO: Taking Stock of Recent Trade Strategy Manoeuvres

Jpn.US.EU.Flag

Peter Draper, Executive Director, Institute for International Trade, University of Adelaide
How to make sense of recent manoeuvres amongst the major trading powers in relation to the WTO? The US is at the centre, so it is necessary to start there. Executive Director Professor Peter Draper reflects on these dynamics following recent travels to Tokyo, Geneva, and Florence.

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Transatlantic relations and the international trading system

US-europe

Steve Woolcock, London School of Economics
Today there are more doubts that transatlantic cooperation is in the mutual interest of the US and EU than at any time since the creation of the GATT.  First, the US Administration is pursuing a purely value-claiming (“I win you lose”) trade strategy vis–a– vis the EU (and other countries) when the norm has been value creating or “win-win”.

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Where is global trade and investment governance headed? A tour d'horizon

tug of war

Professor Peter Draper, Institute for International Trade
Since the US created the post-World War Two liberal international order and is still the pre-eminent global power notwithstanding the growing Chinese challenge, it is uniquely placed to determine the trade and investment system’s fortunes. 

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