News: Opinions

Global Food Systems: Fit for the Future?

Global Food Systems

Ken Ash is an Independent Consultant, IIT Visiting Fellow, and former OECD Director of Trade and Agriculture.
Well-functioning global food systems matter, to all of usGlobal food systems perform well overall, and today provide more safe, nutritious, and affordable food per capita than ever before. At the same time, over 800 million people are undernourished and a higher number are overweight.

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The case for multilateral agreement on digital taxation

digital services

Patrick Low is Former Head of Research, WTO Secretariat 
The growing virtual economy is encouraging countries to introduce digital services taxes and similar mechanisms that are discriminatory, intentionally or otherwise. They distort economic outcomes, reduce growth and generate uncertainty. They provoke trade retaliation, and destabilize tax and trade regimes. A multilateral solution to digital taxation is urgently needed.

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Pacific Trade Agreement Opens Door for Travel Bubble and Rule of Law

Pacific Trade Opens door for travel bubble

Jim Redden; Director, Economic Development Services Ltd. Visiting Fellow, Institute for International Trade, Adelaide University and Peter Draper
Executive Director, Institute for International Trade, Adelaide University.
A ground-breaking trade agreement set to enter into force on December 13th(soon to be announced by Trade Minister Birmingham) could open the door for a regional travel corridor between Australia, New Zealand and most Pacific Island countries, while reinforcing the importance of a rules-based trade order in the region.

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Biden and Berlin: How Germany can help reset transatlantic relations

Biden and Berlin: How Germany can help reset transatlantic relations

Andreas Freytag, Professor and Chair of Economic Policy, Friedrich Schiller University, Jena and Visiting Professor with IIT. 
The election result in the United States (USA) is now certain. Despite the refusal of leading Republicans to recognize the election result and to congratulate the election winner, everything now speaks in favor of the next (and thus 46th) President of the USA being Joseph R. Biden, Jr. This means an experienced Washington insider will again sit in the Oval Office, marking a return to more typical pre-Trumpian forms of policy and diplomacy.

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Building more resilient global value chains

Shipping Yard

Ken Ash, Independent Consultant, IIT Visiting Fellow, and former OECD Director of Trade and Agriculture.
The COVID-19 pandemic emerged in a world characterized by high trade tensions and considerable inertia across the multilateral trading system. A number of countries were moving towards plurilateral, regional and bilateral trade arrangements, and some governments were already beginning to explore ways in which they might more actively shape domestic economic activity.

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Post-Covid 19: Back to the past or the start of a greener future?

Climate Change

Mike Humphrey Senior Trade Advisor at the Institute for International Trade at the University of Adelaide. 
As is the case with most governments world-wide, the Australian government’s concern regarding the recovery from the economic impacts of the COVID-19 crisis has been how to reboot the domestic economy and international trade as rapidly as possible.

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Where does the EU’s Eastern Expansion end?

Richard Pomfret, Professor of Economics & Jean Monnet Chair Economics of European Integration, the University of Adelaide. 
Until 1989 the eastern border of the EU was set by the Cold War.  Since the end of Communism in Eastern Europe in 1989 and the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, sixteen countries have joined the EU and the border has shifted many hundreds of kilometres to the east.   Apart from the three Baltic countries, the EU’s eastern frontier is now the border of the Soviet Union established in 1945.

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Australia-UK relations and the CPTPP

UK AUS flags podium

Richard Pomfret, Professor of Economics & Jean Monnet Chair Economics of European Integration, the University of Adelaide. 
On 17 September Jean Monnet Chair Richard Pomfret participated in an online discussion on
Potential Benefits Of An Australia-Uk Free Trade Agreement with Elisabeth Bowes, Chief Negotiator, Regional Trade Agreements Division, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, and Vivien Life, Director Asia and Australasia Negotiations within the UK Department for International Trade. The webinar was chaired by Peter Draper, Executive Director of the Institute for International Trade at The University of Adelaide.

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Managing the risks of rising government support: a case for policy transparency

Policy Transparency

Ken Ash is an Independent Consultant, IIT Visiting Fellow, and former OECD Director of Trade and Agriculture. 
Governments generally support the smooth functioning of their domestic economies, through maintaining systems of good governance and the rule of law and ensuring a coherent macroeconomic and structural policy environment. Extraordinary support is sometimes also warranted, as is the case today to mitigate the economic impact of COVID-19. Few would dispute that these are essential roles for governments.

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New Data links Outward Investment in Services to Australia’s Services Export Performance

Market Data

Jane Drake-Brockman is Industry Professor with the Institute for International Trade and Founder of the Australian Services Roundtable, which in 2020 celebrates its 20th anniversary.
Measurement of trade in services is notoriously difficult. The official statistics on imports and exports contained in the Balance of Payments (BOP) are well known, for example, as measuring poorly at best only three of the four modes of international supply of services.

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The views expressed here are the author’s, and do not necessarily represent the views of the Institute for International Trade.

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